Blog Posts for Tag: TrueSmarts Inspiration

Rich Kid Smart Kid

Cindy Posted Aug 23, 2012
by Cindy


Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad, wrote Rich Kid Smart Kid in order to help parents teach their children financial lessons that are not taught in schools. Kiyosaki helps you empower your children to increase their financial IQ, secure their financial future, and side step the rat race.

Rich Kid Smart Kid

Rich Kid Smart Kid has a companion website, richkidsmartkid.com, which offers several online games and lots of resources for you to either direct your kids and teens towards or to work through as a family.

This Book's Impact on TrueSmarts:

We agree that there is a glaring gap in our education system with regards to financial learning, so TrueSmarts offers a multitude of activities around Kyosaki's key concepts, and have included this book as one of our most important resources.

Here are some TrueSmarts activities which are based on the Rich Kid Smart Kid book:

 

Other useful and inspiring titles by Richard Kiyosaki include:

 

Comments (0)

Tags: TrueSmarts Inspiration  Expenses  Income  Personal Finances  Liabilities  Assets 

 

Outliers, The Story of Success

Cindy Posted Jun 13, 2012
by Cindy

"Outlier is a scientific term to describe things or phenomena that lie outside normal experience."* A person who is an outlier is someone who is so exceptional as to be outside of normal human experience.

The Outliers Book

In the book titled, "Outliers, The Story of Success", Malcolm Gladwell postulates that success has less to do with innate ability and more to do with a combination of hard work and favorable circumstances. Some of the oportunitie that Gladwell writes about include:

  • birth-date
  • culture/language
  • right time/right place
  • more opportunities to practice


Gladwell takes a close look at what makes someone immensely successful. He explores everything form meteoric rise of The Beatles, to NHL Hockey players, to software giants like Bill Gates; and he exposes a common pattern in the case of each one. Gladwell demonstrates again and again that an opportunity combined with 10,000 hours of meaningful practice is what it takes to create an 'Outlier'.

The Outliers identifies that great success is made up of a complex network of opportunities, culture, upbringing, talent, and hard work.

This book's impact on TrueSmarts:

The idea that we need not only the right opportunities but also 10,000 hours of meaningful work is something that has inspired us at TrueSmarts. Meaningful work means that an activity needs to:

  1. Be mentally challenging
  2. Have an internal or extrinsic reward that is easy for kids to understand.
  3. Allow kids the autonomy to do it.


All of our activities keep these concepts in mind and help you to teach your children key financial, entrepreneurial, leadership and social skills in a way that is both meaningful and rewarding.

Also, Gladwell stipulates that one opportunity that middle class parents can give their children is the cultivation of practical knowledge through a parenting style called "Concerted Cultivation". In concentrated cultivation, children are actively parented. They are taught to talk to and question people in authority, they are taught to manipulate their environment to suit them, parents communicate with their children, protect their children and are actively involved in their children's free time. All of these things combined help middle class children to learn practical intelligence.

TrueSmarts offers a community which helps you to develop practical intelligence in your children using hands on and meaningful activities. It is also, the goal of our activities, and this blog, to help you to recognize the opportunities and favorable circumstances that your children have and then to teach your kids to recognize them as well. We want to help you raise your own little outliers! 


*Quote from a Q&A session with Malcolm Gladwell.

Comments (0)

Tags: TrueSmarts Inspiration 

 

Kids and The Cone of Learning

Cindy Posted May 18, 2012
by Cindy

 

Edgar Dale originally developed the Cone of Experience in 1969.

Since then, many variations of the cone have been created, but one of our favorites is from Robert Kiyosaki‘s book Financial IQ. Robert's Cone of Learning states that after two weeks we tend to retain:

  • 10% of what we read
  • 20% of what we hear
  • 30% of what we see
  • 50% of what we hear and see
  • 70% of what we say
  • and 90% of what we say and do.

 

Regardless of the specifics, we intuitively agree with the general premise.

 Cone of Learning

Impact on TrueSmarts:

Because kids and adults alike retain more information when they say and do something, rote learning is practically nonexistent within TrueSmarts' activities.

We believe that it is important that kids get out and do things in order to fully integrate the important financial and business lessons that you are trying to teach. That's why we have aggregated a wide variety of say and do type of activities which you can use to instantly engage your kids and maximize their understanding.

Types of activities that will make the most of your child's retention include business, presentation, game, public speaking, and project related activities.

Check them out and start today!   

Comments (0)

Tags: TrueSmarts Inspiration 

 

Gardner's Theory Of Multiple Intelligences

Cindy Posted May 7, 2012
by Cindy

Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences proposes that when you judge someone's level of intelligence you should not base your analysis on one general ability, but on a range of abilities. The intelligences do not exist in a hierarchy, and it is generally considered important for a person to exercise and exhibit a multitude of different intelligences for them to be viewed as talented and well rounded.

The intelligences that Gardner identified are as follows:

Multiple Inteligences

Logical-Mathematical

This area has to do with logic, abstractions, reasoning and numbers.

Spatial

This area deals with spatial judgment and the ability to visualize with the mind's eye.

Linguistic

This area has to do with words, spoken or written.

Bodily-Kinesthetic

The core elements of the bodily-kinesthetic intelligence are control of one's bodily motions and the capacity to handle objects skillfully.

Musical

This area has to do with sensitivity to sounds, rhythms, tones, and music.

Interpersonal

This area has to do with interaction with others.

Intrapersonal

This area has to do with introspection and self-reflective capacities.

Naturalistic

This area has to do with nurturing and relating information to one’s natural surroundings.

Why does it matter to us at TrueSmarts?

Multiple intelligence theory is a large part of how we have organized TrueSmarts. We think it is important for children to develop in a variety of different ways in order to be adaptable, flexible and well rounded.

There are other advantages to approaching your child's learning from the multiple intelligences vantage point.  For instance, if you teach your child in a way that appeals to a dominant intelligence it will help to hold a child's attention. Conversely, teaching a lesson in a way that exercises a weaker intelligence helps a child to stay challenged and to be more flexible and well rounded.

Additionally, we know that traditional education has a strong focus on Linguistic and Mathematical intelligences and usually neglects the other intelligences for lack of time and/or resources.  Therefore, TrueSmarts was built as a resource which will help you expand and encourage your child's different intelligences.

We encourage you to browse TrueSmarts.com for the current list of activities for each intelligence:  

 

Comments (0)

Tags: Logical-Mathematical Intelligence  TrueSmarts Inspiration  Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence  Interpersonal Intelligence  Naturalistic Intelligence  Musical Intelligence  Intrapersonal Intelligence  Spatial Intelligence  Linguistic Intelligence 

 

The Story Behind TrueSmarts.com - a Website to Enrich Kid's Financial Literacy, Leadership Skills, Emotional Intelligence and more

Rob Posted Apr 23, 2012
by Rob

 

In this inaugural blog post, I wanted to share the inspiration behind the site.

The idea for TrueSmarts.com came as a result of the intersection of two events in my life: choosing a school for my daughter and the reading of Malcolm Gladwell's book, Outliers.

Children building a house and having fun

Choosing the Perfect School

I have two kids, and the oldest was about to enter grade one. My wife and I were trying to decide which school we were going to enroll our daughter in. We needed to determine whether to continue with her current Montessori school, send her to  the public school that is walking distance from our house, or choose one of the many charter and private schools in our city.

It was this decision that caused me to ask myself the question "what knowledge and skills do I want my daughter to possess as a result of her education?" I was confident that any one of the schools would provide a quality foundation in reading, writing, mathematics, and the other subjects defined within a typical curriculum. However, as an entrepreneur, I started to reflect on the knowledge and skills that I currently possess that I wish I'd had a better grasp on as a child.  I then realized that regardless of what school option we chose, none of them would provide a comprehensive foundation in the knowledge and skills of the working world.

Knowledge and skills such as:

  • Creative Problem Solving
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Leadership
  • Customer Service
  • Financial Management
  • Investing
  • Introspection
  • Business Ownership
  • and so many more that I have found invaluable!

 

The True Story of Success

The other event that occurred at the same time as this insight was the reading of Malcolm Gladwell's book, Outliers, The Story of Success. The book argues that success is not just about innate ability, but rather, ability combined with a number of key factors such as opportunity, meaningful hard work (10,000 hours to gain mastery), and your cultural legacy.

The Birth of TrueSmarts.com

In a moment of clarity, I realized that my wife and I could provide our kids with what I perceived as a meaningful advantage if we could actively cultivate knowledge and skills of the working world through opportunity and meaningful hard work.

I began searching the internet for anything that could help us in our new found mission. I quickly discovered that there is an incredible abundance of useful articles, games and resources for parents and children that touch upon the knowledge and skills that I was after.

But a new problem emerged: it was incredibly time consuming to locate relevant resources, evaluate their potential contribution, and then convert them into meaningful lessons or activities I could share with my children. I needed a mechanism to aggregate the content, and then quickly sort, categorize and filter what was important to me and my family. I needed a site which would provide quick access to impactful activities which would help me teach my kids key skills at opportune moments while keeping it fun. My wife and I also desired an active community of like-minded parents and children with whom we could pool our efforts . A forum where we could swap ideas about what approaches seem to work, other ways to approach a topic as well as to point us toward previously unknown books, videos, games or websites. But this kind of community was also nowhere to be seen.

After failing to find anything that came remotely close to fulfilling our needs, I decided to build a website to help not only my own family but other families that were  heading down the same path. Over the last 12 months, myself and the expert team I've assembled have been actively developing such a site.

I'm now very proud to lift the veil and finally announce the arrival of TrueSmarts.com. Through this site, we endeavour to enrich the entrepreneurial, financial, and business intelligence of children through games, crafts and other fun activities. Currently, the site has an ever-growing collection of activities presented in an easily digestible format. Activities are for kids and teens  aged 4 to 18, and each activity is categorized by age, type (craft, game, book, etc.) and tag (creativity, cash flow, communication, assets, stocks, time management, etc.).

Remember to check back with us because TrueSmarts.com is ever-evolving and in the near future we plan to roll out some very exciting enhancements.

Thanks for reading,

Rob

Comments (0)

Tags: Leadership  TrueSmarts Inspiration  Creativity  TrueSmarts Site News  Investing  Marketing  Customer Service